Introduction on AeroCom experiments... 

***To be done***

Active Experiments

  • ATom

    ATom

    NASA EVS Atmospheric Tomography Mission (ATom) provided unprecedented and rich measurements for aerosols, clouds, precursor gases, and meteorological fields over global oceans. In this study, we aim to address the AeroCom multi-model simulations of aerosols, new particle formation, and clouds constrained by ATom measurements, as well as measurements from various satellites and ground platforms. The study will cover remote regions over the Pacific, Atlantic, and Southern Oceans from near surface to ~12 km altitude and covers four seasons.

    accepting model submissions. Last update: Mar. 6, 2019.
    31 July 2019
    Huisheng Bian, huisheng.bian@nasa.gov
    Christina Williamson, christina.williamson@noaa.gov
    Mian Chin, mian.chin@nasa.gov
  • AeroCom Control 2019

    AeroCom Control 2019

    As for earlier major AeroCom studies, the intention here is to assemble in spring 2019 a set of model simulations representing the state of the art of aerosol modeling. Most important diagnostics for analysing aerosol life cycles and forcing are requested. Simulations for years 2010 and 1850 shall form the basis for a reference paper on phase III of AeroCom and additional experiments and analysis (eg absorption, aircraft, in-situ comparison, historical, median model…). Diagnostics are coordinated with AerChemMIP, so modelling groups may choose to link to simulations made under CMIP6.

    Active. Taking submissions, Diagnostics and new instructions (new filenames) are assembled in new tables, see below (Feb 2019).
    01 June 2019 (welcome earlier when submitting eg for other experiments !)
    Michael Schulz, michael.schulz@met.no
  • Aerosol Absorption Analysis

    Aerosol Absorption Analysis

    Aerosol shortwave absorption affects precipitation and other atmospheric phenomena, through local heating, altering lapse rates and affecting cloud formation. Presently, however, absorption from BC, brown carbon (absorbing OC) and dust is very diversely quantified among AeroCom models. There is also no strong observational constraint on the total, global (or regional) aerosol absorption (see paper linked below).

    Active. Taking Submissions.
    01 June 2019
    Bjørn Samset, b.h.samset@cicero.oslo.no
    Maria Sand, maria.sand@cicero.oslo.no
  • Aerosol GCM Trajectory (GCMTraj)

    Aerosol GCM Trajectory (GCMTraj)

    This experiment aims to perform a multi-model evaluation against reanalysis meteorological fields combined with ground-based observations of aerosol properties in a trajectory-based Lagrangian framework. The representation of source and transport dependence of aerosols to different regions will be examined.

    Ongoing
    accepting model submissions.
    Daniel Partridge, D.G.Partridge@exeter.ac.uk
    Paul Kim, p.s.kim@exeter.ac.uk
  • Aerosol-Cloud-Radiation Interaction (ACRI)

    Aerosol-Cloud-Radiation Interaction (ACRI)

    Our previous study has shown that cloud plays much more important roles on the surface dimming/brightening trends. Aerosol direct radiative effects is only obvious under clear sky conditions. Big questions need to be addressed: (1) What causes the cloud trend? (2) How much is the change of cloud mediated by aerosols through aerosol-cloud-radiation interaction? (3) How does climate change affect the cloud and aerosol trends and their interactions?

    TBD
    31 December 2019
    Mian Chin, mian.chin@nasa.gov
  • Anthropogenic Dust

    Anthropogenic Dust

    Experiments for dust models are proposed to estimate the contribution of land use to dust emission, deposition, and optical properties. In addition a sensitivity study related to the threshold of wind erosion is proposed. Multi-models comparison with observations will provide an envelope of uncertainties.. A detailed description can be found here: Specifications

    Actual participants (Jan 2019): CAM5 (U. Wyoming), GEOS-Chem (U. l'Aquilla), INCA (IPSL/LSCE), AM4 (NOAA-GFDL)
    June 2019
    Paul Ginoux, paul.ginoux@noaa.gov
  • Atmospheric Composition and Asian Monsoon (ACAM)

    Atmospheric Composition and Asian Monsoon (ACAM)

    Motivation: The Asian monsoon system is a major component in Earth’s climate. Given rapid population and economic growth across the Asian monsoon region, serious concern has emerged that coupling between the monsoon system and surface emissions is having increasingly significant effects not only on regional air quality but also on global atmospheric composition. This proposed activity represents a coordinated modeling and analysis effort among the AeroCom, CCMI, and ACAM communities to study interactions between Asian air pollution and the monsoon system.

    accepting model submissions
    31 July 2020
    Xiaohua Pan, xiaohua.pan@nasa.gov
    Jonathon Wright, jswright@tsinghua.edu.cn
    Mian Chin, mian.chin@nasa.gov
  • Baseline Aircraft

    Baseline Aircraft

    Building on the Phase II experiments this effort will support the interpolation of consolidated flight track points from high-temporal resolution model output to minimise the large sampling biases that would otherwise be present.

    Note, we are now only requesting a single year of simulation for the mandatory Tier 1 submissions. Tier 2 submissions are also welcome.

    Submission phase
    Summer 2020
    Duncan Watson-Parris, duncan.watson-parris@physics.ox.ac.uk
    Philip Stier, philip.stier@physics.ox.ac.uk
  • Biomass burning emission injection height experiment (BBEIH)

    Biomass burning emission injection height experiment (BBEIH)

    Smoke aerosols can adversely affect surface air quality and visibility near emission sources and even hundreds to thousands of km downwind, and thus create health and aviation hazards. They also have impacts on air temperature, cloud properties and precipitation. The atmospheric composition of smoke aerosols depends not only on the emitted mass, but also on the injection height. This is especially true for large boreal forest fires that often emit smoke above planetary boundary layer (PBL) into the free troposphere and even the lower stratosphere.

    accepting model submissions
    June 30, 2020
    Xiaohua Pan, xiaohua.pan@nasa.gov
    Ralph Kahn, ralph.kahn@nasa.gov
  • Dust Source Attribution (DUSA)

    Dust Source Attribution (DUSA)

    This experiment will investigate the impact of dust from the prominent dust source regions, and the source-receptor relationships over land and remote ocean regions. In addition to the previous AeroCom experiments which focus on the regions where dust amount is significant, this proposed study will also analyze the source-receptor relationships over more extended regions including Arctic, Antarctic, Tibetan Plateau, and oceanic areas.

    TBD
    30 June 2020
    Dongchul Kim, dongchul.kim@nasa.gov
  • Historical Experiment

    Historical Experiment

    The main aim of the historical experiment is to understand regional trends in aerosol distribution from 1850 to 2015 and make an AeroCom reference aerosol distribution dataset (1850-2015). This experiment will also quantify the aerosol impact on TOA and surface forcing with a main emphasis on the direct aerosol effect. We underscore that the CMIP6 CEDS emissions must be used for the historical simulations. Simulations can either be performed with fixed sea-surface temperature (SSTs), historically evolving SSTs or fixed meteorology for one year.

    Diagnostics and new instructions (new filenames) are given in the new excel sheet. Taking submission.
    01 June 2019
    Gunnar Myhre, gunnar.myhre@cicero.oslo.no
  • Multi-model PPE – BC experiment

    Multi-model PPE – BC experiment

    Direct radiative forcing due to anthropogenic black carbon (BC) is highly uncertain but best estimates suggest a large positive effect (+0.71 [+0.08, +1.27] W m-2). The uncertainty in the total forcing is due to large uncertainties in the atmospheric burden of BC and its radiative properties. The uncertainty in the burden is in-turn due to the uncertainty in emissions (7500 [2000, 29000] Gg yr-1) and lifetime (removal rates). In comparison with the available observations GCMs tend to under-predict absorption near source (e.g.

    Sign-up open and one-at-a-time test results being accepted. PPE simulation results accepted from September 2019.
    For inclusion in AeroCom 2019, one-at-a-time results should be received in August 2019. For inclusion in AeroCom 2020 monthly diagnostics should be submitted by July 2020.
    Lindsay Lee, L.A.Lee@leeds.ac.uk
  • Multi-model PPE – Cloud experiment

    Multi-model PPE – Cloud experiment

    The goal is to understand what factors affect the magnitude of the aerosol-cloud interactions in several different model systems. The indirect radiative effect of aerosols on clouds (ACI, or ERF_ACI according to the IPCC) is the largest uncertainty in climate forcing over the historical record.

    Sign-up open and one-at-a-time test results being accepted. PPE simulation results accepted from September 2019.
    For inclusion in AeroCom 2019, one-at-a-time results should be received in August 2019. For inclusion in AeroCom 2020 monthly diagnostics should be submitted by July 2020.
    Lindsay Lee, L.A.Lee@leeds.ac.uk
  • Remote Sensing evaluation for AeroCom Control 2016

    Remote Sensing evaluation for AeroCom Control 2016

    As part of the CTRL2016 experiment, we propose a remote sensing evaluation of models using a variety of satellite sensors (MODIS, PARASOL, AATSR) and ground networks (AERONET, SKYNET). The only requirement to contribute to this experiment is high-frequency (3-hourly) output of a few model fields (such as AOD).

    Submissions still accepted but contact Nick first
    Nick Schutgens, n.a.j.schutgens@vu.nl
  • TOA flux assessment using CERES

    TOA flux assessment using CERES

    The Clouds and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES) project produces a long-term global climate data record (CDR) that can be used to detect decadal changes in the Earth’s radiation budget (ERB) from the surface to the top-of-atmosphere (TOA). The CERES Energy Balanced and Filled (EBAF) product includes monthly mean shortwave (SW), longwave (LW), and net TOA all-sky and clear-sky radiative fluxes over 1 degree latitude by 1 degree longitude regions. The EBAF SW and LW fluxes are adjusted within their uncertainties to be consistent with the heat storage in the Earth-atmosphere system.

    Accepting model submission
    July 2019
    Wenying Su, wenying.su-1@nasa.gov
  • Trans-Atlantic Dust Deposition (TADD)

    Trans-Atlantic Dust Deposition (TADD)

    Airborne deposition of mineral dust and associated nutrients could fertilize ocean ecosystems and influence ocean biogeochemical cycles and climate. Model simulations of dust deposition depend strongly on the highly parameterized representations of a suite of dust processes with little constraints. In recent years, several intensive field campaigns have acquired new datasets of microphysical and optical properties of African dust.

    TBD
    31 December 2019
    Hongbin Yu, Hongbin.Yu@nasa.gov
  • UTLS aerosol

    UTLS aerosol

    The upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS) is a crucial region for Earth's climate, where changes of aerosol loading and composition can have a direct impact on the amount of radiation absorbed and emitted.

    Taking submissions to AeroCom server.
    31 May 2020
    Mian Chin, mian.chin@nasa.gov
  • Volcanic ACI experiment (VolcACI)

    Volcanic ACI experiment (VolcACI)

    Understanding of how changes in aerosol particles affect clouds remains one of the most challenging and persistent problems in atmospheric science. Aerosol-Cloud Interactions (ACI) are hard to constrain as it operates at scales much smaller than the scales resolved by Earth System Models (ESMs). To rub salt into the wound, lack of suitable observations at globally relevant spatial scales with which to challenge the models hampers our capacity of validating ESM estimates of ACI impacts.

    Ongoing
    accepting model submissions. Last update: May. 21, 2019.
    Florent Malavelle, F.Malavelle@exeter.ac.uk
    Tianle Yuan, tianle.yuan@nasa.gov

Previous Experiments

  • AeroCom Control 2015

    AeroCom Control 2015

    The model versions used for the different experiments are often not easily comparable. New model versions should be documented regularly to establish a state of the art comparison yearly. For this purpose AeroCom offers a semi-automatic platform with visualization via the AeroCom webinterface. Evaluation with surface observations and Aeronet observations will complete the documentation of emissions, removal, burden, lifetime of the major aerosol species.

    Deadline for model submissions to be anlaysed before the Frascati AeroCom workshop: 15.September, on the condition that formatting and naming of files follows the instructions below.
    Michael Schulz, michael.schulz@met.no
  • AeroCom Control 2016

    AeroCom Control 2016

    The model versions used for the different experiments are often not easily comparable. New model versions should be documented regularly to establish a state of the art comparison yearly. For this purpose AeroCom offers a semi-automatic platform with visualization via the AeroCom webinterface. Evaluation with surface observations and Aeronet observations will complete the documentation of emissions, removal, burden, lifetime of the major aerosol species.

    Deadline for model submissions to be analysed before the Beijing AeroCom workshop: 1.September, on the condition that formatting and naming of files follows the instructions below.
    Michael Schulz, michael.schulz@met.no
  • Biomass Burning emissions

    Biomass Burning emissions

    BB experiment aims to compare the performance of the global models in simulating transport and optical properties of biomass burning emissions. We provide a set of about 400 fire&smoke cases observed by MODIS instrument (mostly on Terra satellite) in 2008, and compare model-simulated AOD to those observed by MODIS, as well as intercompare model properties. Given that all models are using the same BB emission input (GFEDv3 inventory) any differences in the output will indicate the differences between model configuration.

    Closed
    Mariya Petrenko, mariya.m.petrenko@nasa.gov
    Ralph Kahn, ralph.kahn@nasa.gov
  • HTAP 2

    HTAP 2

    The Unite Nations’ Task Force on Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution (TF HTAP) is an international scientific cooperative effort to improve the understanding of the intercontinental transport of air pollution across the Northern Hemisphere. TF HTAP was organized in 2005 under the auspices of the UNECE Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution (LRTAP Convention).

    Closed
    Mian Chin, mian.chin@nasa.gov
    Michael Schulz, michael.schulz@met.no
  • Indirect Effect

    Indirect Effect

    The proposed study is designed to address two key areas of uncertainty: 1) the sensitivity of cloud liquid water path to aerosol, and 2) the competition between heterogeneous and homogeneous nucleation of ice crystals.

    To address issue 1), we’ve added daily and monthly diagnostics that can be compared with CloudSat and MODIS retrievals of the relationship between the aerosol optical depth and the probability of precipitation (Wang et al., 2012).

    Closed
    Submission of results by 1 December 2013
    Steve Ghan, steve.ghan@pnnl.gov
    Xiaohong Liu, xiaohong.liu@pnnl.gov
  • Nitrate comparison

    Nitrate comparison

    Nitrate is an important atmospheric aerosol component and impacts on air quality, climate, and ecosystem. Nitrate will be more important in the future climate study owing to projected growth of future population and energy use. It has been concluded that aerosol nitrate has to be included to the current suite of aerosol types (sulfate, BC, OC, dust and sea salt) in the next generation of climate models by the NARSTO final report [http://www.narsto.org/sites/narstodev.ornl.gov/files/AerosolProcesses_Final.pdf].

    Closed
    2014
    Huisheng Bian, huisheng.bian@nasa.gov